Articles - how does that work?

A total of 25 items listed.

HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Spectrum

Radio spectrum is the part of the electromagnetic spectrum, a continuous range of wavelengths, that is widely used in modern technology.

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Powerline networking

Powerline networking is a form of communication that uses electrical wiring to carry both data and alternating current (AC) electrical supply through existing electrical infrastructure.

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Lithium-ion batteries

Li-ion batteries have revolutionised modern life, through their application in consumer electronics and by powering applications as diverse as medical implants, grid-scale storage and satellites

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Toughened glass

Tempering the glass to compress the outer surface and expand the inner layers balances the tension in the glass to make it tougher.

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Li-Fi

Light fidelity (Li-Fi) is a wireless communications technology that transmits high-speed data via common household light emitting diodes (LEDs)

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Noise-cancelling headphones

Active Noise-Cancelling (ANC) headphones are used mainly by train and plane passengers wanting to listen to radio, music or film without hearing background low-frequency engine and travel noises.

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Peltier devices

A discovery by French physicist, Jean Charles Peltier, was crucial for enabling these devices.

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Hydroacoustics

The ocean remains the earth’s most uncharted territory, but is now able to be accessed by hydroacoustics.

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Tunnel boring navigation

Tunnel boring navigation

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - Accelerometers

Accelerometers

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - AEROGELS

Aerogels

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HOW DOES THAT WORK? - RFID

Radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology has been around since the 1970s. The first RFID tags were used to track large items, such as livestock and airline luggage.

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